Cultural Events

Bringing a Bit of Japan to You!

On occasion, we work with creatives in our community to offer workshops and classes on aspects of Japanese culture, like bento design, ikebana, or temari crafting. Take a peek below to learn more about our events, or check our calendar here to see what new events are coming up! 

Table of Contents:

Temari Workshops

Hosted by Lindsay Amor (Aomori, '08-13, JETAA PDX Member).  Beginner class covers basic stitches and skills.  Ball Wrapping starts with basic materials and construction.  Intermediate level uses the ball from the Wrapping class and covers measurements, guidelines, and an intermediate pattern.

Time of year: variable

Beginner Level ($15, 2022 Date TBD)

Temari is an old tradition, but it's hardly outdated: these thread-covered balls make lovely gifts and holiday decorations! We'll give you a kit of everything* you need to do a "kiku" (chrysanthemum) pattern in two colors of your choice, with live instruction via Zoom. No experience or preparation is necessary. Kits will be mailed at least a week in advance.  
*Ok, not quite everything: bring your own scissors!

Please do not RSVP if you can't attend the workshop, it will not be recorded.
Cost includes kit and shipping.

Ball Wrapping (FREE, January 29, 2022) -- Register by January 16.

Intermediate Level (FREE, February 12, 2022) -- Register by January 30.

  • Both are Saturday events, 12-3pm.  Zoom link will be sent to registrants.

  • Register here for either event; please register twice for both.

  • Not near a craft store or only joining the Intermediate Level? 
    Order a kit here, $15 (includes materials and shipping).

Ikebana Workshop 

Introducing the masterful Nana Goto-Bellerud. Nana has been studying at the Sogetsu School of ikebana since 2005. She has held exhibitions and demonstrations of ikebana at the Portland Art Museum, the Portland Japanese Garden, and Leach Botanical Garden. Through her demonstrations and workshops, she seeks to introduce others to the art of ikebana and to inspire more to study the art. Check out some of Nana's amazing work on instagram @nana_bellerud

Next Workshop Date: TBD, summer 2022

Class of June 26th, 2021 >>

Thanks for coming out!
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Furoshiki Gift Wrapping Event

Join us for a virtual eco-friendly gift wrapping event. Finally learn how to use those furoshiki you bought from Japan, or dig out that fabric you bought last year and never used to wrap gifts for the upcoming holiday season.

No RSVP necessary for this event, simply click the zoom link below to access the event.

When: early December

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Kakizome (New Year's Calligraphy)

Kakizome (書き初め) means "first writing of the year," and is said to represent one's wishes for the coming 12 months. Whole poems or even a single kanji: how will you write your auspicious hopes?

No RSVP necessary for this event, but we recommend rounding up the materials listed below. This event is also open to everyone, so feel free to invite your family and friends!

When: Saturday, January 22, 4:00 - 5:00 pm (PST)

Zoom link: 

https://us06web.zoom.us/j/82186228627?pwd=NExMUXdwRi9qQUEyQ0xIWDJ1V0xKUT09

 

Meeting ID: 821 8622 8627

Passcode: 082751

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–Materials–

If you don’t have any of these on hand, you can find them at Fred Meyer, Target, Michael’s, or your local craft store.

 

You’re going to need:

1) A writing utensil: a Japanese calligraphy brush is ideal, but brush pens, or any kind of rounded paintbrush you have will do. Water brushes work well too, just don't add water to the reservoir or you'll don’t dilute your ink. Tombow Fudenosuke or Tombow dual brushes are great brush pen options.

 

2) Ink: (If you use a brush pen, you don’t need to worry about this)

Sumie ink or other calligraphy ink is ideal, but you can also use one of these alternatives:

• Black watercolor paint

• Watered down black acrylic or tempera paint

• Black gouache

• Instant coffee, made very strong to resemble ink

 

3) Paper: some copy paper to practice on, and some thicker, heavier paper to write your final draft on, such as watercolor, mixed media, or heavy drawing paper. Copy paper will also work fine for your final draft in a pinch, but will warp and wrinkle a bit from the water. 

4) A table covering:

Make sure to put down some plastic wrap, wax paper, or newspaper under your paper when you write! The ink and paint will soak through the copy paper and stain whatever you’re writing on.

5) Calligraphy practice grid:

Download a printable grid here to help you keep your kanji characters the same size as you practice on during the workshop: